Arrol-Johnston 15.9 Boat-tailed roadster

History of the Arrol-Johnston Marque

Arrol-Johnston (later known as the Arrol-Aster) was a Scottish automobile manufactured from 1896 to 1931.

Locomotive engineer George Johnston turned his attention to internal combustion in 1894, not long after his experimental steam tram had burned. In 1896, George Johnston designed and constructed Scotland’s first motorised dogcart style car called the Mo-Car. A company was formed in 1901 called the Mo-Car Syndicate Ltd based in Paisley, to produce it which was headed by Sir William Arrol, an engineer of the Forth Bridge.

In 1905 the name was changed to the Arrol-Johnston Car Company Ltd.

The dogcart was propelled with an opposed-twin engine having four pistons; it was high, slow, and started by pulling on a rope through the floorboards; nevertheless, it was built until 1905. That year, the company introduced a 3023cc 12/15hp model of more modern appearance; this, however, still used an opposed-piston engine. There was also a three-cylinder version of the dogcart; this was an uncouth 16hp with the centre cylinder being of greater bore than the outer two. In 1906 came the 24/30hp vertical four of 4654cc; followed in 1907 by the 38/45hp of 8832 cc. The 12/15hp twin survived in production until 1909. This was the year that George Johnston left and T. C. Pullinger (formerly of Darracq, Sunbeam and Humber) joined Arrol-Johnston; he swept out the old range in favour of the new 15·9hpof 2835cc. That model featured a dashboard radiator and four-wheel brakes (the latter were dropped in 1911). For 1912 a 1794 cc 11·9hp, a 3640 cc 20·9 hp and a 3618 cc 23·8hp were introduced.